open heart surgery

This Week’s Good News!

Posted on Updated on

A recent post in the subscription-only web magazine, The Week, had the following story to share:

When Seth Marko discovered he needed emergency open-heart surgery, he wasn’t sure what would happen to the Book Catapult, his San Diego bookstore. Then Scott Ehrig-Burgess, manager of a rival bookstore nearby, stepped up.

He offered to run the Catapult while Marko, 43, was in the hospital, and recruited eight volunteers from other bookstores to help. For more than a week, Ehrig-Burgess faithfully opened and closed the Catapult and trained the volunteers while also working at his own shop.

“It’s pretty incredible,” said Marko.

Rival bookstores combine to be an extraordinary book-selling community!

Advertisements

Long-term care (LTC) insurance policies: Rejection hurts.

Posted on Updated on

An insurance agent from a large, widely-known insurance company recently told me that 50% of all applicants for long-term care (LTC) insurance are rejected.  Boy, with those statistics, it’s hardly worth pursuing, knowing that the hurt of rejection might be in your future.

John Matthews, Caring.com senior editor and attorney gives all of us a reality check:

“No one has a ‘right’ to buy long-term care insurance.  That results in insurance companies refusing to sell policies to people they think are likely to collect on the policies soon, or who might collect for a long time.  If an insurance company thinks the odds are that it might not make money on you, it won’t sell you a policy.”

WOW – that’s encouraging isn’t it?

While doing research for this article, I found the information provided by insurance brokers about LTC insurance to be very enlightening.  Apparently many LTC insurance companies will accept you as an insured if you have had open-heart surgery, but will balk at covering someone who has arthritis.  Why you may ask?  I was told it is because the insured with heart issues will die before needing benefits whereas the person with arthritis will most likely become disabled and therefore cost the insurance company too much money in benefits payout.

Wow – that’s depressing, and somewhat maudlin, isn’t it?

I stand by my earlier article, Long Term Care Insurance Scares Me.  Insurers are trying to sell a product for which so few are eligible.  I thought I was scared before.  Now that I’ve done my research, I’m petrified!

Please share your experiences trying to obtain LTC insurance.  Whether you were accepted or rejected – we want to know.  If you were rejected and appealed the insurance company’s decision – we REALLY want to hear about it.