Kindness Fridays

Posted on Updated on

  • Bionic hip
  • Loss of independence
  • Healthcare TLC

I received a new right hip this past Monday afternoon which rendered me fully dependent on the staff of a local hospital, Evergreen Health Medical Center in Kirkland, Washington. As a two-night inpatient at the hospital, I was reliant on staff for absolutely all of my needs.

If you can imagine everything you do during the course of a day requiring at least one medical person to provide intimate assistance, you can easily imagine all the tasks incumbent upon the nurses, certified nursing assistants(CNA), physical therapy personnel, food delivery staff, and even someone such as Barbara the housekeeper, at your beck and call.

My personality is such that I’d much rather be giving than receiving. Each time I pushed the nurse call button I carefully considered whether such a request was warranted: bladder full to rupturing, yeah, warranted; refill of my patient water carafe? Maybe I could wait and encumber the next person who walks into my room.

From the time I checked in for surgery at 11:30 Monday morning until I was discharged at 2:30 Wednesday afternoon, each person with whom I came in contact was fully dedicated to serving my needs. They noticed if my blankets were pushed asunder in my bed and straightened them comfortably around my body. When shuffling with my walker to the bathroom while wearing my backless hospital-issued gown they discreetly covered me up and made sure my dignity was kept intact.

Then there was the aforementioned employee who after knocking on my door said, “It’s just me, Barbara the housekeeper.” Upon granting the 60-something-year-old admission to my room, she said, “I want to be sure your room is clean and acceptable. You don’t need to do a thing, just lay there – and you (my husband) sit comfortably in the folding chair and I’ll work around you.”

I engage absolutely everyone I come across in conversation so it was quite natural for me to converse with Barbara the housekeeper. I asked her how long she had been working at Evergreen and it had been quite some time. “You must have seen lots of changes over the years.”

“Yeah, of course I have, but it’s good. I like what I do. I like all the people I get to meet over the course of a day.”

“I’m sure you’ve met those who, because of their circumstances, weren’t exactly the most friendly people you’ve encountered in your life.”

“Aw, sure, but you get that everywhere, not just in a place like this.”

True, so very true. As I’ve mentioned in past blog posts, each of us has a choice of whether to make or break someone’s day. I can tell you that there was not one employee at the hospital who broke my day, rather, each person made my stay there as palatable as it could possibly be. Mind you, the dings of call lights going off all day and all night from the nurses’ station directly across from my room weren’t the highlight of my stay, but those dings are far easier to accept when you realize that you initiated your share of call dings yourself and benefited from the responses of the dedicated medical personnel who had to answer such pleadings.

All in all, I’d have to say that if you have to go through the pain of getting a new and improved hip in order to lead a more comfortable life going forward, being treated with kindness during the process certainly renders the recovery far more appetizing. This former patient has no complaints whatsoever. She was treated like a queen.

 

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Kindness Fridays

    Jill Weatherholt said:
    October 13, 2017 at 2:43 pm

    My stays in the hospital weren’t ever this pleasant. I’m happy they took good care of you, Irene. Praying for continued healing. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    Theresa Hupp said:
    October 13, 2017 at 2:20 pm

    Irene,
    It’s always nice to hear stories of good customer service, which caregiving is one form of. Best wishes as you heal, and do your physical therapy!
    Theresa

    Like

    nrhatch said:
    October 13, 2017 at 12:24 pm

    Glad that you experienced good care after your surgery. Wishing you a speedy recovery . . . but take it slow and easy for awhile, especially on the downhill slopes!

    Liked by 1 person

      Irene Olson responded:
      October 13, 2017 at 1:43 pm

      Thank you for your kind wishes. I feel I’m improving each day. So important to acknowledge even the smallest of victories in life and that’s what I continue to do regarding my surgery recovery.

      Like

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