Caregiver Guilt.

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Do you feel as though you don’t visit your loved one often enough at the long-term care (LTC) facility in which they live?  Try to acknowledge that guilt as a feeling that may not necessarily reflect an accurate reality of how attentive you are towards your loved one.

The local caregiver.

Many people have expressed their concerns to me that they’re just not doing enough for their loved one who lives in a LTC facility.  Even when a caregiver visits Mom several days a week, the caregiver still feels guilty for not making more of an effort to be there for her.

Guilt is a valid feeling – I believe all feelings are valid – but the feeling of guilt may not accurately reflect what is going on.  Let’s face it, most of us are hard on ourselves.  The old adage, “we’re our own worse critic” came about resultant from generations of people who unfairly beat themselves into the ground.

At a recent gathering I attended, a woman expressed how guilty she felt for not visiting her mother more often than she thought appropriate.  Another person, also a caregiver, suggested that this person ask herself whether or not she felt she was doing the best she could in this situation.  “If you are, then perhaps your feeling of guilt is based on emotion rather than reality.”  Whether five visits a week or one visit a month – if that’s the best a person is able to do, then it’s sufficient.

Some of us caregivers simply need to cut ourselves some slack.  Even when the loved one we’re visiting has no concept of the passage of time and is not able to discern whether they’ve been visited as recently as the last hour or as long ago as last year, we still berate ourselves for not being there more frequently.

Caveat: I need to add that even if your loved one doesn’t a) recognize you; and b) can’t quantify the passage of time, you are still a wonderful addition to that person’s life.  No staff caregiver can take your place when it comes to providing a loving presence for your Mom who lives in a facility.  Just being there with a smile, a hug, and speaking words of compassion can do wonders towards brightening Mom’s day.

Dad and my brother a year after our dad's Alzheimer's diagnosis.

The long distance caregiver.

My biggest role as a caregiver was that which I performed long distance for my father who lived in a dementia unit in a Southern Oregon assisted living facility.  I felt like I was doing something truly valuable for him while I was there but as soon as I boarded the plane for Seattle the guilt enveloped me.  Usually the first night of my return was spent crying because I felt I had been impatient with him, or I acted flustered when I had to answer a question that my father had already asked me no less than two dozen times prior.  I relived every moment of my visit, criticizing this and that about what I did, or didn’t do.  I was a wreck.  I had to talk myself into believing that dad did have a good time and dad was genuinely happy to see me, and by golly, I didn’t do that bad of a job as a caregiver daughter.

Dad and I with one of his dementia unit caregivers.

I could then relax knowing that he was being well-cared for in my absence; my visits augmented that care; and I could rest on that fact rather than falling back on my guilt.  The NY Times article, Being There and Far Away sheds some light on the long distance caregiver’s experience.   I hope you’ll take the time to read the article as I believe it will touch on some topics that all caregivers may experience.

As I mentioned in my Blog entry, “Deathbed Promises and How to Fulfill Them” take a deep breath and shed the mantle of guilt you’re wearing.  It doesn’t do you any good and it gets in the way of you being the best caregiver you can be.  Cut yourself some slack and don’t be so hard on yourself.

Do your best – that’s all that is required.

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One thought on “Caregiver Guilt.

    […] Caregiver guilt. Share this:TwitterFacebookEmailPinterestPrintRedditLinkedInTumblrLike this:LikeBe the first to like this post. This entry was posted in 21st Century Living, Alzheimer's/Dementia, Caregiving, Family issues, Finances, Health & Wellness, Personal Struggles, Senior Housing and tagged AARP, AARP Bulletin, AARP Magazine, activities of daily living, Adjustment disorder, ADLs, adult caregivers, adult day care, assisted living, Caregiver, caregiving, family caregiving, long-term care, long-term care housing, Medicaid, Medicare, Nursing home. Bookmark the permalink. ← A Hibiscus flower to brighten your day […]

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