Transportation challenges with Mom and Dad.

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Because of your flexible work schedule, you are the designated driver when it comes to taking Mom and/or Dad to doctor appointments.  Well, the older your parents get, the more feeble their bodies, and the more potential for aggravating factors such as cognitive decline.  What should have been a 2-hour outing has become an all-day event.

Remember the good ol'days? Neither do I.

I’m quite certain that many of you reading this article have struggled in your efforts to drive Mom or Dad to their many doctor appointments.  Getting Dad into the car is one thing, but getting him out?  My goodness – through no fault of his own, he’s forgotten the process and you don’t have the strength to lift him out.  With Dad’s cognitive decline, his understanding of what it means to sit or stand on command has decreased.  The ol’ “Ally Oop!’ maneuver or the “1-2-3 Stand!” command just won’t work any more.  What’s a person to do when you are not able to exert the strength to facilitate such an action on your father’s behalf?

Dad and I on a picnic, Spring 2005.

When I visited my father in the long-term care (LTC) facility in which he lived, my goal was to get him out of the facility as frequently as possible.  I took him on picnics, on walks around a park’s perimeter, up and down the aisles of a supermarket – anything to provide a change of scenery for him.

As my father’s dementia increased, however, these outings became less and less practicable.  I was not blessed with a strong back so my attempts to lift him out of the car or onto a park bench were met with horrendous failure.  I grieved the cessation of these activities but I just couldn’t manage my father’s body any more.  And not being able to go on these outings really curtailed the enjoyment of our visits together.

Had I lived in the same town as my father, another person could have accompanied me who was capable of assisting with the transfer of my father in and out of the vehicle.  Unfortunately, my father lived in Southern Oregon and I live in the Seattle, Washington area so calling upon a friend to go along on these outings was not an option for me.  If you, however, live near your loved one, do yourself, and your loved one, a favor by bringing another family member or a friend who has the ability to assist with the mechanics of transporting Dad on outings.  Not only will the physical assistance help, but you’ll have someone else with whom to visit when the conversation with Mom or Dad lags due to cognitive decline – or hearing difficulties.

Another benefit of having an additional person with you is that you are introducing your friend to the unavoidable process of aging.  This may sound like a negative benefit, but truly, it is not.  You will open your friend’s eyes to the future that awaits us all while also providing him with a lesson on how to enhance the life of someone whose world has been drastically reduced in size.

See?  It’s a win-win-win situation!  You receive the help you need, your parent gets a change of scenery, and your friend learns a valuable lesson.

I want to encourage you to check into local resources that provide suggestions on how to be the best caregiver you can be.  For example, your local chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association is a very valuable resource. They have numerous articles within their website and a 24-hour Helpline 1-800-272-3900 to ease you through this process.  There’s one thing on which all of us caregivers can agree – we can’t do it all by ourselves.  Reach out to receive the assistance that you so richly deserve, and that others are willing to provide.

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