Avoiding the pitfalls of selecting Senior Housing.

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You’re patting yourself on the back, congratulating yourself for:

  • finally deciding that it’s time to move into Senior Housing; and
  • deciding which type of long-term care (LTC) option suits your needs.

Now what?  You’re scared to death because of the abhorrent negative press you’ve read regarding certain types of Senior Housing.  Good for you – you should be!  There are ways to make your selection a more trustworthy one.  What follows will hopefully weed out the bad eggs, but there is absolutely NO guarantee the decision you make is 100% sure.

WORD OF MOUTH

Chances are that those similar to you in age – your friends, work associates, neighbors – have looked into or are currently looking into Senior housing options and they can be a very worthwhile resource.  Don’t be afraid to ask them to share their experiences with you and you’ll certainly do the same with others as their needs become known to you.  Better yet – if you know of someone who already lives in a LTC facility, visit them to discern what they think about their own choice.

HOUSING SEARCH RESOURCES 

Where will your path take you?
  • Check out your state’s Aging & Disability Services Administration department (linked here is Washington State’s ADSA.)  You really can’t go wrong checking out your State’s services for the Senior population.  These resources usually have links to long-term care facility research tools, such as the Assisted Living section of my local state’s ADSA.  No doubt your State’s Aging & Disability department will have similar links.  If you’re looking for retirement communities that involve totally independent living, or a Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC), an all-care type of residential model mentioned in my previous blog “Selecting a Senior Housing Community”, your search will be less informational because most States do not license retirement communities.
  • STATE INSPECTION SURVEY.  All licensed facilities in the United States are inspected/surveyed every 12 – 18 months.  This survey is quite thorough and covers absolutely EVERY aspect of a facility’s operations.  When you tour a facility, always ask to look at a copy of that building’s latest State Survey.  By law they must make it available to anyone who asks.  I don’t think I would ever consider a Senior housing option without reading the building’s State Survey.  You’ll find minor or major citations which will be very telling as to how the building is run and how the Administration or Owner of the building responds to such citations.

LONG-TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM (LTCOP)

Every state must have a long-term care ombudsman program in place.  These programs are mandated by the Federal Older Americans Act and are intended to improve the quality of life for people who live in long-term care facilities.  A call to the LTCOP intake line in your state is a call worth making.  Let’s say you’ve narrowed down your housing search to a few options.  You ask the LTC Ombudsman’s office about the types of complaints that have been filed against those facilities and this office will provide worthwhile information to help you make your housing decisions.  The National Long-Term Care Ombudsman Center  will help you locate your local LTC Ombudsman program.

SENIOR HOUSING LOCATORS

You’ll notice that I’ve placed this type of resource at the bottom of my list.  There are numerous housing “finders” out there and they can certainly be helpful.  You tell them what you’re looking for; what area of town you prefer; what type of care you need; and what you’re willing to pay; and they’ll come up with some options for you.  Please keep in mind, however, that these senior housing finders have an inventory of housing clients that may or may not be representative of all that is out there.  They may come up with some very good options for you but their list will most likely not be an exhaustive one.

Regardless of what/who you use to locate a LTC facility, I hope you’ll go through the previous options I’ve listed above to discern the appropriateness of any facility you’re considering.  Perhaps a Senior Housing Locator has provided what appear to be some great options for you and you’ve even toured them and feel comfortable with what is offered.  Prior to making your final selection, at the very least go through your State’s Long Term Care Ombudsman to discern whether or not any recent actions or citations have been placed against that facility.  And when touring any housing location, be certain to ask for the facility’s latest State Inspection Survey so you can see what the State thinks about that facility.

My father & I on a picnic a year before he died.
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4 thoughts on “Avoiding the pitfalls of selecting Senior Housing.

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