Conversation with a Mentor.

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Conversation with a Mentor.

This article from a fellow blogger who happens to live in Singapore is very timely in that it discusses how a caregiver might sort out their thoughts when caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or other dementia.

I really enjoy this blogger’s way of writing about her journey – she’s a caregiver for her mother.

I hope you enjoy it too!

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Alzheimer’s Reading Room: Joy vs Grief.

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The Alzheimer\’s Reading Room is the number one source of life news for the entire Alzheimer\’s community.

via Alzheimer\’s Reading Room.

The attached article reflects the sentiments of Bob DeMarco, a son who took care of his mother Dotty for over 8 years during a difficult Alzheimer’s journey.  He rarely complained – which is stellar, but not required – and now a few weeks after her death, he’s falling back on the memories and finding joy amidst the grief.

Long-term care (LTC) insurance policies: Rejection hurts.

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An insurance agent from a large, widely-known insurance company recently told me that 50% of all applicants for long-term care (LTC) insurance are rejected.  Boy, with those statistics, it’s hardly worth pursuing, knowing that the hurt of rejection might be in your future.

John Matthews, Caring.com senior editor and attorney gives all of us a reality check:

“No one has a ‘right’ to buy long-term care insurance.  That results in insurance companies refusing to sell policies to people they think are likely to collect on the policies soon, or who might collect for a long time.  If an insurance company thinks the odds are that it might not make money on you, it won’t sell you a policy.”

WOW – that’s encouraging isn’t it?

While doing research for this article, I found the information provided by insurance brokers about LTC insurance to be very enlightening.  Apparently many LTC insurance companies will accept you as an insured if you have had open-heart surgery, but will balk at covering someone who has arthritis.  Why you may ask?  I was told it is because the insured with heart issues will die before needing benefits whereas the person with arthritis will most likely become disabled and therefore cost the insurance company too much money in benefits payout.

Wow – that’s depressing, and somewhat maudlin, isn’t it?

I stand by my earlier article, Long Term Care Insurance Scares Me.  Insurers are trying to sell a product for which so few are eligible.  I thought I was scared before.  Now that I’ve done my research, I’m petrified!

Please share your experiences trying to obtain LTC insurance.  Whether you were accepted or rejected – we want to know.  If you were rejected and appealed the insurance company’s decision – we REALLY want to hear about it.

Reminiscence and reminiscence therapy

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Reminiscence and reminiscence therapy.

I found the attached article very interesting and promising.  Anyone who has been a family caregiver, or a professional caregiver, knows the seemingly insurmountable struggle to engage with someone who has Alzheimer’s or other dementia.

My work path in life always includes those with dementia so I will definitely look into this therapy.  But let’s face it – as us Baby Boomers move onward into our future, we’re already looking for ways in which to brighten our memories when what we’re searching for may be on the tip of our tongue, but it refuses to jump off!

Lighten up Mondays.

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Bill and George were always competing against each other.

After one argument over who was better at folding and packing parachutes, they went skydiving to settle the dispute.

Bill jumped first, pulled the cord, and began to float gently to earth.

Then George jumped and pulled his cord, but nothing happened.

Next he yanked on the safety cord, but that didn’t work either.

In a matter of seconds, George, falling like a rock, flew past Bill, and said,

“So, you wanna race?!”

Moving Mom and Dad – or your spouse.

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Moving Mom and Dad – Leaving Home is an article from the June/July 2012 AARP Magazine.  Statistics on aging are astounding, and scary.  “By 2020 some 6.6 million Americans will be age 85 or older.”  That’s an increase of 4.3 million from the year 2000.  Time to celebrate – right?  We’re living longer – and in some cases – thriving in our older age.  The reality of the situation, however, is that eventually we’ll need some sort of assistance with our activities of daily living (ADLs) that might require a move to a care facility of some sort.

The stories presented in the attached article describe family instances where emergent circumstances warranted an emergent decision to move a parent into some sort of care facility.  The best case scenario, as this AARP article suggests is that you, “dig the well before you’re thirsty.”  Nice sentiment – but not always possible.

I have written numerous articles for my blog that address the difficulties the caregiver, and the one needing care, go through when making the decision to choose a long-term care (LTC) facility for a loved one.  Below are links to each of those articles.  I hope they prove beneficial to you.

Deathbed promises and how to fulfill them.

Caregiving: The Ultimate Team Sport.

Selecting a Senior housing community – easy for some, not for the rest of us.

Avoiding the pitfalls of selecting Senior Housing.

Adjustment disorder: a long-term care facility side- effect.

Be an advocate for your aging loved one.

Visiting a loved one at a long-term care facility.

Caregiver guilt.

A Hibiscus flower to brighten your day

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Today.

A fellow blogger in Singapore posted the flower you’ll see when you click on the above link.  Gorgeous, gorgeous, gorgeous.