Lighten up Mondays.

Posted on

The following entry is somewhat humorous but even more so, it is challenging to all of us who strive to make an impact on the world in which we live.

Mother Teresa 1985 cropped
Mother Teresa 1985 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Overheard:  “My greatest fear is that I will be standing behind Mother Teresa in the Final Judgment line and I’ll hear God tell her,

“You know, you should have done more.”

Advertisements

HUMOR!!!!! Men’s and Women’s Brains: are they different?

Posted on Updated on

The difference between Men’s and Women’s Brains is  a very entertaining video, and I think you’ll all find something in this humorous video that might resonate in your own life.

Please take the time to view the video, especially those of you who don’t think you have 13 minutes in which to be entertained by humor that might make a difference in your mood and/or your behavior today.

I wish the best for all of you on this first full day of Summer 2012.

But how am I supposed to do THAT?

Posted on

But how am I supposed to do THAT?.

What a terrific article provided in the above link from the “Taking Care of Mom and Dad” blog site.  The information provided in this article is valuable, and as Kelli mentioned on her blog, it’s not just specific to the state in which it originated, Oklahoma.  The information provided is applicable everywhere because let’s face it – every caregiver pretty much needs the same questions answered and this site has many one-size-fits all solutions for all caregivers who are grasping to stay afloat on their caregiving journey.

This same website can also direct you to your own state’s valuable resources by clicking on the applicable section on the Homepage.  It’s as easy as that!  And don’t we all need something to be easy every once and awhile?

ABSOLUTELY!!!!!

Lighten up Mondays.

Posted on

Baseball player Babe Ruth
Baseball player Babe Ruth (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Carl and Abe are two old baseball fanatics.  They agree that whoever dies first will try to come back and tell the other one if there’s baseball in heaven.

One evening Abe passes away in his sleep.  A few nights later Carl hears what sounds like Abe’s voice.

“Abe, is that you?” he asks.

“Of course it’s me,” Abe replies.

“I can’t believe it,” Carl whispers.  “So tell me, is there baseball in heaven?”

“Well, I have good news and bad news,” Abe says.  “The good news is, yes, there is baseball in heaven.  The bad news is you’re pitching tomorrow night.”

Life’s final deadline.

Posted on

In the past year, I have lost two coworkers to cancer.  Just recently another coworker left his job due to – you guessed it, cancer – so he could spend what remaining time he has with his family. These wonderful people were given a death sentence.  They had a head’s up as to when their life’s end/deadline would occur.

Because I care for these people, I’ve been grieving and pondering what their remaining days and weeks were like.

What does one do when they leave their doctor’s office after receiving a fatal prognosis and a guesstimate of how much time remains for them?  Of course the initial news floors them and their emotions run wild with rawness, sadness, fear, and maybe even extreme anger.  But then they get home, hopefully surrounded by at least one loved one, and…then what?

Scrabble game in final stages
Scrabble game in final stages (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I know much discussion will ensue of an emotional, practical, and perhaps even legal manner.  That goes without saying.

But do you then get out your bucket list and see if any remaining items can be checked off before time runs out?

Or how about a game of Scrabble?  Does that seem too mundane and unimportant in light of life’s waning hours?

I’m not trying to be cavalier about this matter and I hope I’m not coming off as insensitive.  I’m really troubled by even thinking about having such a prognosis and filling out my remaining days in a valuable way.  And again, I’m thinking about my coworkers’ final days and wondering what those days were like for these stellar people.  How did they manage?

Personally, I have a very realistic outlook on death – it’s certainly inevitable.  I’ve accepted the fact that no one can escape it.  And of course I have my preferences on the manner in which I die.  For example, if I’m fortunate, I’ll follow in my mother’s footsteps when back on September 24th, 1994, she went to bed none the worse for wear, and never woke up again.   Since no autopsy was done, we don’t know the actual cause of death but on this my family can agree – if we have the choice, we’d like to be taken by surprise – in as pain free a manner as possible.  If I’ve left no statements unsaid, no deeds left undone, I’d rather not have a calendar in front of me crossing out each remaining day in my life.

How would I fill my days if, like my coworkers, I’m given a death sentence of a finite period of time?

I don’t have the answer, so if by chance you’ve been part of life’s final deadline with a loved one or close friend, what proved valuable to you and your loved one?  How did you manage not to think of the remaining time every minute of every day?

In short – how did you survive the process?

Seattle Times: Seniors for Sale, Part 6

Posted on

In yesterday’s post, a Seattle Police Detective defined elder abuse as:

  • sexual abuse
  • physical abuse
  • financial exploitation
  • neglect

In Part 6 of Seniors for Sale: Placement perils and successes, Michael Berens, Seattle Times reporter, delves into the senior housing placement industry, focusing on one placement company that placed a client in a Tacoma-area Adult Family Home (AFH) with a history of safety and health violations – elder abuse –  even a fatal event, but because the placement company had not done its research, it was not aware of the home’s previous infractions and kept placing unknowing vulnerable adults in the home’s care.

Many of these placement service companies operate state-wide and/or nation-wide, and believe that there is no way that they can help as many people as they do if they are required to visit each and every home/assisted living option available to the public that they are trying to assist.  These companies are oftentimes characterized as Bed Brokers – an industry that is growing exponentially without much scrutiny or State controls.

CAVEAT: Just as in every assisted living situation – there are good senior housing options and there are bad senior housing options – so too there exist reputable senior placement companies, and not-so-reputable placement companies.

I personally think that these companies can be helpful to those looking for a senior housing option that suits their, or their loved one’s, needs.  I caution those using these agencies, however, to understand that not every option out there is listed with placement companies.  If a senior housing company does not choose to be listed with a placement service company, that option will not be offered, even if that particular housing option might be the very best choice for some families: cost-wise, location-wise, and even service-wise.

In a news update, Michael Berens’ article, State gets tough on referrals for elder care, we see that attention is now being directed at these placement referral companies in the hopes that those they serve – vulnerable adults in need of some sort of daily care – are protected from those companies who are simply aiming to make a profit at the most vulnerable time in an elder’s life.

As I mentioned in previous articles found in my blog category, Senior Housing, there are numerous resources available for those looking for senior housing for themselves or a family member.  Please go to that category and type in a search term in the space located on the right-hand side of the page to find the topic that interests you most.

Seattle Times: Seniors for Sale, Part 5

Posted on

Part 5, of Seniors for Sale: Hiding Harm: the human toll, is one example of the lack of reporting that goes on in some assisted living residential settings – in this case – an Adult Family Home (AFH).

When you watch the video link above, you’ll be shocked at how a particular accident happened – and its after effects on the victim –  and you’ll be horrified at how long it took before it was reported to the police.

Perhaps this statistic will provide a partial explanation:

only 16% of all incidents of elder abuse are reported.

The Seal of Washington, Washington's state seal.
The Seal of Washington, Washington’s state seal. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Not only are many caregivers not reporting incidents of abuse that occur; surprisingly, family members fail to get beyond the denial stage when they discover that their loved one just might be in danger in the very location entrusted to his/her care.  They can’t believe that the caregiving solution they found for their loved one has turned out to be disastrous in every way.

The police investigator for this case states the following:

We don’t tolerate domestic violence, but that’s not always the case with elder abuse.

The final episode of Seniors for Sale will be submitted tomorrow, Saturday.